Recent Posts

  • Baltic Way in LithuaniaReport: The 30th Anniversary of the Baltic Way in Lithuania
    When we land in Vilnius it is a beautiful, late August evening. We drop our bags at the hotel and after a few minutes we are walking to the great Cathedral square, a popular meeting spot. There’s a big crowd, locals and tourists alike are there. We hear somebody speaking Italian: in this season, a lot of our fellow countrymen visit Lithuania.   We are there because we want to report on the 30th anniversary of the Baltic Way. It was such a pivotal […]

The Lapteviečiai project – Voices from the Silence

You don’t get to choose the stories you tell. They choose you. They are there, in plain sight. Like Poe’s Purloined Letter, you don’t see them. Then, little by little, as an imperceptible destiny, your eyes meet them more and

Lithuania Today

We visited Lithuania for the first time in June 2005. The country had become a member of the EU just over a year before, together with the other two Baltic States: Latvia and Estonia. It is difficult to know exactly

About us

Marina Macrì Journalist and photographer, is currently responsible of the editorial services at P.M. Studio and its website pmstudionews.com, dedicated to the world of Photo- graphy. She has produced a series of travel reports in different countries like Georgia, Lithuania,

About Lithuania

Lithuania is a small country and covers an area of 65.300 square kilometres. If we compare it to Italy, the whole Lithuanian territory is similar to Veneto, Lombardy and Piedmont, all together.

It has less than 3 million people. There are over 600.000 Lithuanians who live abroad. A fifth reside in the United Kingdom, 5.8% in the USA. The Lithuanian American Community is the biggest in the world: about 700.000 people reside there.

Most of Lithuania is flat, with many forests and lakes. The Curonian Spit (Neringa in Lithuanian) is the Western border of the country. It is an amazing peninsula that divides the Curonian Lagoon form the Baltic Sea. Neringa is a long and narrow strip of land, 98 kilometres, 52 of them in Lithuanian territory. The rest belongs to Russia. It is Kaliningrad, a Russian enclave that borders with Lithuania.

At three o’clock in the morning of June 14th 1941, on Moscow’s orders, deportation began simultaneously in the three Baltic States of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The Chekists were mobilized in Belarus, Smolensk, Pskov… An unbroken chain of overcrowded trains, one after another, was heading East, carrying people, who for most part, would never return home.

Dalia Grinkevičiūtė

Special thanks to Agnė Buckutė, responsible for the website ITLIETUVIAI.it, for helping us with this project.

Marina and Edo

Special thanks to Elena Refraschini, teacher and journalist, for helping us in English.

Marina and Edo